The Client

Repeat Roses is a social impact-meets-sustainability service. The organization charges wedding and event hosts a service fee to remove, restyle, and distribute their event flowers to charitable organizations. Finally, Repeat Roses recollects the flowers and containers for composting and recycling, diverting the event floral waste from landfills

The Problem 

The floral industry contributes 1 billion pounds of waste annually in the US. Repeat Roses proposes a clear solution yet the business is rapidly outgrowing their current system of initial client interaction. 

The Solution 

We designed an online platform that lays out a streamlined process for clients to learn about the service, request quotes and communicate with the company

My Role

User research, interviews, usability testing, competitive analysis and content strategy 

Tools

 Sketch, Invision

The Team

Soul Won Cheung, Manoj Vasudevan, Kathleen Tucker

Time frame

 Seven week-long sprints 

 
  1. Business stakeholder interview to understand the business goals & wedding industry research

  2. Review of top customer service issues for insights into the current pain points

  3. Competitor analysis to understand how competitors communicate their value proposition

  4. User Interviews with usability study and card sorting to understand user goals, usability of the current website and potential new information architecture

  5. Comparative analysis of websites for inspiration on how to communicate social impact & quote animations 

I. Research 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Understanding the domain

We knew the wedding industry is huge and there are companies similar to Repeat Roses, so narrowing the scope was important for this project. To get an idea of what the greatest needs and frustrations are in wedding planning and floral decisions, we familiarized ourselves with the wedding industry by looking at studies and reports online.

A 2014 study by The Knot showed weddings are becoming increasingly expensive despite guest lists getting smaller as brides are willing to spend more for meaningful and intimate weddings.

“Couples are focusing on creating an amazing guest experience and reception details, including finding unique venues to reflect their personality." 

- Rebecca Dolgin, editor-in-chief of The Knot

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Understanding the competitors  

We continued our research by evaluating direct competitor websites. We also explored indirect competitors to help us qualify our research findings and provide additional insights as we began building our design direction.

 

Understanding the users

We turned our user research to interviews to better understand brides’ goals and frustrations. We interviewed three brides-to-be, three married women, and two engaged men to find out:

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  • Wedding planning methods and resources
  • Emotions during different stages of wedding planning
  • What needs differ at different stages of wedding planning
  • What motivates users to practice sustainability 
  • What motivates users engage in charitable contributions

 

 

Usability Study

What we did: We asked our users to find information on the Repeat Roses website about how the business works, what impact the business has, how to request a quote, what is included in the service fee, and where the flowers were donated.

Objectives: We then briefed the participants about Repeat Roses and took our user research into a task based usability study to measure how well the original Repeat Roses website meets their wedding planning needs. 

What they said

I saw info on what the problem is and the negative environmental impact, but I don’t remember seeing anything on how they work to mitigate the issue.
— Holly
Initially when you started describing the service, I thought, ‘WOW, I am so glad businesses like this exists.’ Then I didn’t get that same feeling resonate with me about their impact once I saw their website.
— Lindsey
I don’t get the process. Is Repeat Roses a florist? Do we buy the flowers through them?
— Stephanie

Some of what we found

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Repeat Roses Customer Journey Map

Emotional Complexity

They experience similar excitements and frustrations at some parts of the journey, but sometimes, their feelings differ from time to time.

Anxiety before the Dawn

Bride and Grooms are experiencing more intense emotions and stronger feelings closer to the end of wedding planning

journey map.1.JPG

Based on those insights, we created two personas that encompass our users' goals and frustrations.

persona 1..png
personna 2.png
 

II. Defining our problem

Our client wants us to design an effective way for the prospective clients to learn about the service, request quotes, communicate with company, register, and pay for the service.

We not only uncovered the need to improve the quote process but also identified a different need for all our users: there is too much information on the Repeat Roses website and participants are overwhelmed. By addressing this need, we believed we could bring the most value to Repeat Roses.

 

To address the problem, we came up with five design principles to guide our solution:

  • Make “Requesting a quote” more accessible
  • Simplify the information on how the process works
  • Reduce the amount of copy and images
  • Make service fee more transparent
  • Use infographics to communicate RR impact.

III. Bringing ideas to paper

 

We used the following questions to guide our ideation:

  • How can we create a simplified quote and onboarding process for brides?
  • How can we show brides concise information about how Repeat Roses works?
  • How can we alleviate brides’ questions service fees?
  • How can we communicate the social and environmental impact?
 ex. Sites like  Oscar  skip personal information when requesting quotes and users can add personal information in later once they create an account.

ex. Sites like Oscar skip personal information when requesting quotes and users can add personal information in later once they create an account.

For most concepts to work, we needed to incorporate an onboarding process so that we could understand how similar companies communicate values to encourage brides to enter necessary quote information. As apart of my research, I looked at health insurance sites to study how they collect information about new users while maintaining a low barrier to entry.

IV. Iterating our design

 

We converged the following concepts: onboarding and requesting a quote, content strategy, simplified navigation, and infographics to communicate Repeat Roses' social impact meets sustainability mission.

We considered content more carefully, making sure to bring clarity to service fee and tax benefit information.

User flow

I lead the creation of the user flow that addresses the business and user goals. We used this as our guide for information architecture and content strategy throughout the design process. 

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Sketches

We started our visual design process with some visual thinking, here are some samples from that process:

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Low-fidelity Prototype

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An early version of our clickable prototype for learning about Repeat Roses and requesting a quote can be found here

We then moved into Sketch and InVision to design our low-fidelity prototype to determine our user flow for information architecture, key features and functionalities.

Our low fidelity prototype focused on three core features: simplified navigation, info graphics to communicate the company's impact & clarification on the quote process 

 

Below is a comparison of the Repeat Roses original website to our early protoype, I have annotated our design principles

 Repeat Roses Home page. Users are confused and often mistake the business for a charity. We have simplified the homepage and highlighted key service information, simplified the navigation and added call to action buttons that align with our user flow

Repeat Roses Home page. Users are confused and often mistake the business for a charity. We have simplified the homepage and highlighted key service information, simplified the navigation and added call to action buttons that align with our user flow

 How We Work functions as a FAQ section and highlights key business information. Users were frustrated by the amount of copy and they did not fully understand how the service works or what the business impact is. We included infographics to help communicate both service and impact

How We Work functions as a FAQ section and highlights key business information. Users were frustrated by the amount of copy and they did not fully understand how the service works or what the business impact is. We included infographics to help communicate both service and impact

 Requesting a service quote is buried in the top navigation. We also decided to change from a web form to an interactive quote animation. 

Requesting a service quote is buried in the top navigation. We also decided to change from a web form to an interactive quote animation. 

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V. Usability Testing

We tested a total of 4 users (3 brides and 1 groom)

User Testing Objectives

  1. Learn about the service - how the service works, social & environmental impact, tax deductible service fee

  2. Request a quote

  3. Contacting Repeat  Rose

 

 

Focusing on:

  1. Ease of use

  2. Ease of finding information

  3. Navigation

  4. Content

  5. Images

I lead the usability testing of our prototype.

We asked users to tell us what they expect to see, complete different tasks on the site and find information and rank their experience on a scale of 1 to 10, 10 being the highest. 

Key Findings

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VI. Heuristic Evaluation

After making the low-fidelity prototype, our team performed a heuristic evaluation. We made several important improvements, including:

  1. We found issues with our image selection and decided to do more research on effective infographics
  2. We improved user freedom by adding “Back” buttons while requesting a quote.
  3. We made the tone of the website reflect the business mission and chose to increase the visuals to resonate the impact.

VII. UI Research & Style Guide

 

We performed research about how people interact with and use web interfaces to inform our UI design decisions. Below are some insights: 

  1. Dexterity: moving interface elements like pull down menus and walking menus, can be problematic for navigation. We decided to use static user interface widgets and ample white space between elements to facilitate easy navigation and selection.
  2. Vision: to ensure readability, our text is size 18pt or larger. The strokes on our buttons and other containers are also high in contrast. We also selected a color palette that passes the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) AA standard defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C).

We drew conclusions from our Heuristic Evaluation and UI Research to develop our style guide:

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VIII. Final Design

As we continued our research, we moved to high-fidelity prototypes and went through various design iterations.

   High contrast homepage with minimal text                         Simple infographics to communicate service details                    Customer storytelling and business mission                                                                                                                                                                                                             communicated in one page

  High contrast homepage with minimal text                         Simple infographics to communicate service details                    Customer storytelling and business mission                                                                                                                                                                                                             communicated in one page

            Animated request a quote process with added a progress bar                                     Added back buttons to allow users more freedom when filling out form 

           Animated request a quote process with added a progress bar                                     Added back buttons to allow users more freedom when filling out form 

 

What I learned  

 

 

 

Next Steps

Create an effective design solution aligning business and user goals.

Effectively execute the UX process as a team.

Coordinate design activities with multiple teams.

Communicating service vs. communicating mission.

A/B testing with the current design vs new design to determine usability and conversion improvement

Integrate with the design for post-quote process.

Development hand-off